Mercedes CLA Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I bought my 2017 CLA 220d a year ago from a main dealer mercedes garage, it doesn't have a Jack, is this because the previous owner/garage forgot to put it back in? or does this model not come with a Jack?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
510 Posts
I bought my 2017 CLA 220d a year ago from a main dealer mercedes garage, it doesn't have a Jack, is this because the previous owner/garage forgot to put it back in? or does this model not come with a Jack?
Does not come with one.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
605 Posts
….. it doesn't have a Jack, is this because the previous owner/garage forgot to put it back in? or does this model not come with a Jack?
……………...
The 220d is exported to the UK and certain other countries.
Like some other EU car makers, the CLA does not have a spare tire Or jack & tools. MB feels that the "Run Flat Tires" eliminate the need for all of that. Some of us here on this Forum, feel that this represents an error in judgment by MB. In any event jack kits are available from a variety of sources, including eBay, as are the space saver spare, which won't fit under the boot floor lid.
:mblogoblack:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
No spare?

Some modern cars , esp on the entry level models now come without spare tire and jack.
Saves some wgt. and money for the manufacturer,.
The wgt saving turns into marginally better fuel economy, helping them meet CAFE
standards.

Typically these cars feature a tire slime/inflator kit instead, to get you home if there is a small puncture ,
Or run-flat tires on the more prestigious brands.

Neither solution is as good as having a spare, and have serious shortcomings.
For example, if you shred your tire or there is a sidewall puncture, it probably means a tow.

Run flats are notorious for developing sidewall bubbles and an unpleasant ride. I hate them...
So this new trend serves the manufacturer and does the customer a disservice.

We should fight it!

At the time when you purchase a car, this is probably not even on your checklist, although I put it on mine now.
I refuse to buy a car w/o at least a donut spare.

You can add a donut spare and a jack for under $200 here in the US,
(highly recommended)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Run flats

Run flat tires are not used as an economy move on "entry level" cars. My Corvette GrandSport roadster listed at $82,800 and has run-flats. The real reason for introduction of run-flats is safety from catastrophic tire failure. The additional benefits become obvious in performance vehicles (actual or imagined) are several. Run-flats by their very design have very heavy sidewalls. This allows for larger diameter tire that allows for a lower series profile. My Corvette runs 20 inch rears with 25 series profile, 19 inch fronts with 30 series profile. The lower the profile the faster the tire responds to input from the steering wheel and has less tire role over. This contributes to improved contact patch of tread to road. I have been at Ron Fellows Motor Sports diving school and know the capabilities of these great tires available today. All my performance oriented cars over the last years have had run-flats is inception. If a driver tends to push the limit of his/her ability then the run-flat can provide the 1% to keep it on the road. On the track or auto cross, this is the only tire to run. Measurable results. Disadvantages? Replacement cost and harsh ride. All run-flats are harsh!! Low profile, stiff sidewall. The ride impressions between the 40 series run flat and equivalent 40 series none-run flat is noticeable. In most cases not a big deal. You like the car and a choppy ride then enjoy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,851 Posts
Yeah rfts are a little heavy with all that extra sidewall material but at least in the case of the oem bridgestones i loved the rim protector which sticks out a good 10mm or so and does not give.
Now if and when they do some 235/40-18 rfts at 20~21lbs i will be all over them
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
326 Posts
This is the first car I've owned that had run-flats. I hated the ride, low mileage life and the added expense. I replaced the worn out factory Continental tires at 20K with a second set of run-flats - same story.

I was in for a service at the dealership and was talking with the service manager about our motorcycles. During our chat he had to send out a tow truck to pick up a pretty new MB that had run-flats. I asked if this was a rare occurrence since most of their line had run-flats. He said; "No it happens all the time, this is the second today - run-flats suck". I asked if MB offered a spare for my car and he said; "Unfortunately, no". I then turned to the CLA Forum and found back in 2014 nothing was available besides a 5th. full size wheel & tire that wouldn't fit the storage space in the trunk.

I then gave the situation a little thought. I've been driving for 50 years and for the last 30 I've been averaging around 80K miles spread across three vehicles per year. I've only had 3 flats that required a spare tire change in all 50 years. As a result - my present set of tires are Pirelli All-season non-run-flats that handle, ride and wear much better for less money! I went to Wally World and bought a decent plugin tire inflator/can-o-slime kit that fits easily in the under-floor storage space in the trunk for less than $45.00. I did the same on my wife's GLC300 when the factory set wore out at 18K. Her second set are Michelin's Cross/Climates. We've gone about 30K miles so far between them and we're totally pleased with the result.

I don't recommend this to anyone that gets a lot of flats but, we do have AAA as a back-up and have more affordable, longer lasting, better performing tires on both our cars.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top